Welcome to the Q&A for ECN/APEC 2010, where you can ask questions and receive answers from your fellow students, the TA, and your professor.

Please only ask questions about the material for the course.

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Welcome to the Q&A for ECN/APEC 2010, where you can ask questions and receive answers from your fellow students, the TA, and your professor.

Please only ask questions about the material for the course. Try to create discussions about the material we see in class, instead of just thinking of economics in general (this is an introduction to microeconomics class, not a policy or government class).

For questions and discussions about course organization or other course related topics, come see us after class or during office hours.

Feel free to discuss quiz questions on the Q&A, but do not provide direct answers to quiz questions before the quiz's due date.

Does the Q&A system lead to a monopoly of class credit?

+3 votes
74 views
The way I understand this system is the people with the most likes get the most credit, while the people with the least likes get the least credit. There is no flat amount of like to credit ratio. It's all an average comparing students to other students. Does this inspire people to not like other people's questions and answers? Do people taking this class with a group of friends have an advantage over people taking it alone? Are dislikes displayed and counted in the grade book?
asked Jan 16 by canvas-ac3bbe8213418 (125 points)

4 Answers

+3 votes
I think it inspires people who really want extra credit to try and answer questions or like answers on a deeper level. It challenges them to have a real opinion on matters or to really study. It encourages us to question and develop real questions we have. Do people have friends like there stuff? Maybe but that does not mean that there question will be the most liked because of 3 to 5 friends in that class. If your are alone you still have an amazing mind that can think or see things others can not. You can make a difference. As for the dislikes I do not know. Hopefully the Professor or TA will be able to help you with that.
answered Jan 17 by canvas-c48fd900b6cfe (245 points)
To the issue of down-votes, you are able to down-vote questions and answers you find less useful, but this *does not* influence other students reputation score. The only thing that influences your reputation score is up-votes on your questions and answer.
+1 vote
I think the Q&A motivates students who are looking to get their grade to the next level. If you are working the hardest on the Q&A and producing the most quality content, you will be rewarded with the most points. Everyone has an opportunity to enter the market of the Q&A, so it not a monopoly.
answered May 1 by canvas-111f4c97e5534 (185 points)
0 votes
I believe that this question is a very good question. i think that the q&a system is a good idea, and helps us know more in depth about the course. I also agree that if a group of friends get together, they could possibly have a greater advantage.
answered May 1 by canvas-e415876b4fe9a (251 points)
0 votes
i believe that the QandA is a good way to help students out. I don't however like the fact that people that have group of friends may boost their grade more. Also the QandA is really hard to gain points because people don't tend to like others questions and help others out when they are trying to get a higher score. i have noticed that with several questions from poeple.
answered May 1 by canvas-98fa74eec54bd (240 points)
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